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Health alert: measles

MeaslesThe Texas Department of State Health Services has issued a measles health alert and is urging immunization against this highly contagious illness. Tarrant County Public Health (TCPH) reported a total of 10 confirmed cases of measles, all related to one person traveling to a foreign country and bringing back the infection.

Measles, also called rubeola, is a highly contagious respiratory illness spread by contact with an infected person through coughing and sneezing. It causes a total-body skin rash and flu-like symptoms, including a fever, cough, and runny nose. Though rare in the United States, 20 million cases occur worldwide every year. Measles is so contagious that if one person has it, 90 percent of the people close to that person who are not immune or vaccinated will also become infected with the measles virus.

Since measles is caused by a virus, there is no specific medical treatment and the virus has to run its course. But a child who is sick should be sure to receive plenty of fluids and rest, and be kept from spreading the infection to others

Cook Children's resources

Here are resources from the experts at Cook Children's to help you learn about measles and why vaccines are so important in protecting your family.

Measles alert for Tarrant CountyMeasles alert for Tarrant County
Tarrant County Public Health (TCPH) reported a total of 10 cases of measles, all related to one person traveling to a foreign country and bringing back the infection. Measles is a highly contagious respiratory illness spread by contact with an infected person through coughing and sneezing.

Why are preventable diseases on the rise?Why are preventable diseases on the rise?
A measles alert in Tarrant County and a rise in pertussis in Texas causes great concern for Donald Murphey, M.D., medical director of Infectious Disease at Cook Children's.

Time for back-to-school immunizationsTime for back-to-school immunizations
As the school year begins, make sure your child is protected with immunizations, regardless of his or her age. Jason Terk, M.D., gives you the latest on vaccines from kindergarten to seventh grade.

A shot of reality – A pediatrician's view on immunizationsA shot of reality – A pediatrician's view on immunizations
In her more than 22 years of private practice, Audrey Rogers, M.D., has had to calm fears about immunizations a few times. Dr. Rogers understands the hesitancy of a new parent because of all the misinformation out there, but her primary concern is the health of the children she treats.

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